media.jpg

Media

MaineBiz
03.28.2019
The Portland-based Environmental Health Strategy Center is asking the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works to examine the federal response to risks associated with toxic PFAS chemicals (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) in sewage sludge that for decades has been spread as fertilizer on farmland. Read the rest at MaineBiz .Read more
Environmental Health Strategy Center
03.27.2019
U.S. Senate Committee to Hold Hearing Tomorrow on ‘Forever Chemicals’ PORTLAND, Maine, March 27, 2019— In advance of a federal hearing tomorrow, health advocates are urging federal investigation to determine if toxic PFAS chemicals in sewage sludge spread as fertilizer are contaminating farmland, agriculture products, and drinking water nationwide. A hearing by the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works will begin 10 a.m., Thursday, March 28 to examine the federal response to the...Read more
Bangor Daily News
03.26.2019
ARUNDEL, Maine — More than two years after learning drinking water and milk tanks on his 100-year-old Stoneridge Farm were contaminated with a class of chemicals linked to cancer and other health concerns, farmer Fred Stone still can’t sell his milk and is losing hundreds of dollars a day, every day. Stone said he never knew the wastewater sludge he was licensed by the state to spread on his fields and other fields across York County contained PFAS, a class of industrial chemicals linked to...Read more
Portland Press Herald
03.26.2019
State environmental regulators announced Friday that all sludge will have to be tested for the presence of an industrial chemical before being used as fertilizer or applied to land. The Maine Department of Environmental Protection announced the new testing requirement in response to growing concerns about contamination from PFAS, a group of chemicals widely used to create non-stick coatings on cookware, food packaging and fabrics, as well as in firefighting foam. An Arundel dairy farmer has...Read more
Environmental Health Strategy Center
03.22.2019
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: In response to an announcement made today by the Maine Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) that it will require the testing of all sludge material licensed for land application in the state for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), the “forever chemicals” that ruined a dairy farm and its milk and drinking water in Arundel, Maine, the Environmental Health Strategy Center issued the following statement from Mike Belliveau, Executive Director: “We applaud...Read more
Environmental Health Strategy Center
03.20.2019
Presentation on Toxic Chemicals in Food Additives Open to the Public this Morning AUGUSTA, Maine, March 20, 2019— At an information session open to the public this morning, an internationally recognized environmental health expert will brief Maine legislators on research findings related to health-harming toxic chemical food additives that include PFAS, a class of chemicals currently making headlines in Maine and worldwide. PFAS chemicals (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) are now in Maine's...Read more
Environmental Health Strategy Center
03.19.2019
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Elyse Tipton, (207) 699-5775 or (207) 632-8983 cell/text Farmlands Threatened by Toxic “Forever Chemicals” from Industry Advocates Slam State’s Failure to Investigate Potential Widespread Contamination from Sludge Spreading after Toxic Chemicals in Milk from Maine Dairy Farm Were Found at Highest Known Level ARUNDEL, Maine, March 19, 2019— The same highly toxic industrial chemicals that poisoned a 100-year old dairy farm, its milk, and a public drinking water...Read more
Portland Press Herald
03.19.2019
Fred Stone says he can't sell milk from his herd because of exposure to PFAS, chemicals linked to cancer that were found in the sludge he spread on his fields for decades. ARUNDEL — Public health advocates on Tuesday called for Maine to ban the use of municipal sludge as fertilizer and to phase out an industrial chemical that has ruined an Arundel farmer’s livelihood and contaminated a public water source. Dairy farmer Fred Stone said he never knew the sludge from sewage treatment plants that...Read more
Maine Public
03.19.2019
Two weeks after Gov. Janet Mills signed an executive order to study the prevalence of a family of chemicals that pose potential public health risks, environment and health advocates are urging her to do more. They staged their call to action Tuesday at a dairy farm in Arundel, where contamination from the chemicals known as PFAS was discovered two years ago. Frank Stone's family has farmed on the same land in Arundel for more than 100 years. It started with his grandfather, and now Stone and...Read more
Fosters.com
03.19.2019
ARUNDEL, Maine — More than two years after learning drinking water and milk tanks on his 100-year-old Stoneridge Farm were contaminated with a class of chemicals linked to cancer and other health concerns, farmer Fred Stone still can’t sell his milk and is losing hundreds of dollars a day, every day. Stone said he never knew the wastewater sludge he was licensed by the state to spread on his fields and other fields across York County contained PFAS, a class of industrial chemicals linked to...Read more
Reuters
03.19.2019
ARUNDEL, Maine (Reuters) - For Maine dairy farmer Fred Stone, the discovery in 2016 that his cows were producing tainted milk has since brought financial ruin and threatened to shut down a century-old family business. Now state regulators and health experts are investigating whether the contamination could reflect a much broader problem for farms that used similar methods to fertilize their land. The chemicals on Stone’s farm likely came from biosolids, or nutrient-rich sewage from municipal...Read more
News Center Maine
03.19.2019
A century-old dairy farm is in danger of shutting down after milk tests showed high levels of the chemical PFAS. Watch the full report from News Center Maine :Read more
Environmental Health Strategy Center
03.06.2019
For Immediate Release: March 6, 2019 Action Needed on Toxic Chemicals that Threaten Public Health and the Environment In response to an Executive Order issued today by Governor Janet Mills to create a Task Force to investigate and prevent toxic pollution from extremely persistent toxic chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), the Environmental Health Strategy Center released the following statement from Michael Belliveau, Executive Director: “We applaud Governor Mills for...Read more
Portland Press Herald
02.19.2019
"AUGUSTA — Lawmakers are once again considering requiring schools to test drinking water for lead following the discovery of elevated levels of the harmful metal in some schools connected to public water systems. Under current law, the roughly 300 schools that draw their water from wells must test for lead at least once every three years. But about 500 schools on public water face no similar requirement because water suppliers are already required to conduct extensive testing even though lead...Read more
Environmental Health Strategy Center
12.03.2018
Advocates call on EPA to finalize proposed ban, protect Americans from toxic products Washington, D.C., and Portland, Maine — In response to a national public health campaign in which the Portland, Maine-based Environmental Health Strategy Center is a key leader, Amazon.com posted a new policy prohibiting the sale of the toxic chemicals methylene chloride and N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) in all paint stripper products it sells, effective March 2019. The company is the eleventh major retailer to...Read more